Precursor to testosterone

The influence of high doses of testosterone and anabolic steroids on testicular endocrine function and on circulating steroid binding proteins, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and cortisol binding globulin (CBG), were investigated in power athletes for 26 weeks of steroid self-administration and for the following 16 weeks after drug withdrawal. Serum testosterone and androstenedione concentrations increased (P less than ) but pregnenolone, 17-hydroxypregnenolone, dehydroepiandrosterone, 5-androstene-3 beta, 17 beta-diol, progesterone and 17-hydroxyprogesterone concentrations strongly decreased (P less than ) during steroid administration. Serum pregnenolone, 17-hydroxypregnenolone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate concentrations followed the changes of the corresponding unconjugated steroids but 5-androstene-3 beta, 17 beta-diol and testosterone sulphate concentrations remained unchanged during the follow-up time. During drug administration SHBG concentrations decreased by about 80 to 90% and remained low even for the 16 weeks following steroid withdrawal. Steroid administration had no influence on serum CBG concentrations. In conclusion, self-administration of testosterone and anabolic steroids soon led to impairment of testicular endocrine function which was characterized by low concentrations of testosterone precursors, high ratios of testosterone to its precursor steroids and low SHBG concentrations. Decreased concentrations of SHBG and testicular steroids were still partly evident during the 16 weeks after drug withdrawal. The depressed circulating levels of dehydroepiandrosterone and its sulphate may indicate that the androgenic-anabolic steroids also suppress adrenal androgen production.

Potential risks and side effects
There is very little clinical research on treating pre-menopausal women. From the small amount of research available, it seems that the androgen levels achieved by treatment, as well as side effects, are the same as those in post-menopausal women. The main untoward effects are acne and facial hair. These occur if the level of testosterone is above normal. However, some sensitive women may have these effects with a level in the normal range. Occasionally fluid retention can occur. If testosterone rises above physiological levels, an abnormal lipid profile may occur. There are no side effects to DHEA itself because there are no receptors in the body for DHEA; all side effects are from the conversion product of DHEA, which is testosterone. Women with a history of breast cancer, severe liver disease, or severe deep vein phlebitis should not take androgens, as a certain amount of testosterone will be converted to estrogen. This treatment is also contraindicated during pregnancy, since testosterones, and even its precursor DHEA, cross the placenta and may cause changes in the genitals of the fetus. Special caution should be used when treating women of childbearing age. When prescribing testosterone treatment to a woman, be sure to prescribe adequate birth control and a warning that the androgen treatment should be stopped immediately if a pregnancy might be even remotely possible, or when considering pregnancy in the near future.

That's it!

It's not difficult, hard, or complicated...it's actually really, really easy to do!

But strangely enough, some guys just don't get it.

Which brings me directly to disclaimer number 2 (sorry folks, but this has to be done).

If for some reason you do not understand the concept above, or are not willing to do it, please leave this page now.

The LAST thing I want is for you to order one supplement, take it 36 days in a row, then email me, complaining that it doesn't work.

I'm tired of getting emails like this!

If you can't or will not cycle, move on please, there's nothing to see here.

Precursor to testosterone

precursor to testosterone

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